21 - 23 October, 2019
Leonardo Royal Hotel Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands

What has changed in the last decade


About Ken Bonefield-Nielsen

Former Head of the Corporate Security and Anti-counterfeiting for Sony Mobile, now running his own company called Bonefield.dk.

What has been your key takeaway of the event so far?

There have been several takeaways. The first takeaway is that organisations are investing a lot in innovation, incubation and all these great things. But we may not be that great in actually defending them aggressively. One thing is that we have patents, and so on, but I see quite a number of organisations, and I have also been given the impression that people are not doing as much as they should to protect these things. 

I’m really impressed that I could see some competitors here and they are talking and discussing freely. So, I think this get together, this network thing, is very important here for the industry, as well.

And why do you think that events like this are so useful to have in the industry? Why is it a good opportunity for them to meet and, you know, discuss this topic?

I think that we are all more or less facing the same problems and issues, despite having different ideas and different solutions. It is great that we are able to exchange this, and competitors can actually work together, sharing and exchanging information to protect their legitimate business, while the criminals are out there. 

What is the main benefit for yourself and for your organisation of attending an event like this?

As a new start-up company, it’s definitely meeting potential customers and clients. But, also learning what’s going on, taking the temperature, and feeling in what direction the wind is blowing. Conferences like these, which are well-organised, can be a huge benefit for both small and enterprise companies. 

What do you think has changed most about IP in the last decade in the way that people, map out IP and the organisational approach to it?

I don’t know if it’s the last ten years, but it’s become a lot more business-oriented. Instead of just, okay, I’m an engineer, I’m brilliant at innovating something, and then, of course, it should be patented. But now it’s actually a business of selling the patents, utilising it or not, and so on. I think that’s a great thing, that’s a part of the platform where we will see more ongoing innovations in the future that we really need. 




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